“Come with every wound
and every woman you’ve ever loved
every lie you’ve ever told
and whatever it is that keeps you up at night
every mouth you’ve punched in
all the blood you’ve ever tasted
come with every enemy you’ve ever made
and all the family you’ve ever buried
and every dirty thing you’ve ever done
every drink thats burnt your throat
and every morning you’ve woken
with nothing and no one
come with all your loss
your regrets, sins
memories
black outs
secrets
come with all the gold in your mouth
and that voice like needle hitting record
come with your kind eyes and weeping knuckles
come with all the blue ink
come with your babies
come with your swollen heart
i’ve never seen anything more beautiful than you”
— Warsan Shire  (via ethiopienne)

(via ethiopienne)

k-a-t-i-e-:

South Bronx, 1970

Camilo José Vergara

(via klappersacks)

typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 
typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard
OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.
This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

typeworship:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard

OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.

This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

bookriot:

Pumpin’ It Bookworm Style
bookriot:

Pumpin’ It Bookworm Style
bookriot:

Pumpin’ It Bookworm Style
bookriot:

Pumpin’ It Bookworm Style
“So, yes, let’s take the figure of the feminist killjoy seriously. Does the feminist kill other people’s joy by pointing out moments of sexism? Or does she expose the bad feelings that get hidden, displaced, or negated under public signs of joy? Does bad feeling enter the room when somebody expresses anger about things, or could anger be the moment when the bad feelings that circulate through objects get brought to the surface in a certain way? The feminist subject “in the room” hence “brings others down” not only by talking about unhappy topics such as sexism but by exposing how happiness is sustained by erasing the signs of not getting along. Feminists do kill joy in a certain sense: they disturb the very fantasy that happiness can be found in certain places. To kill a fantasy can still kill a feeling. It is not just that feminists might not be happily affected by what is supposed to cause happiness, but our failure to be happy is read as sabotaging the happiness of others.”
— Sarah Ahmed, Feminist Killjoys (And Other Willful Subjects)

(via queerandpresentdanger)

ilovemymariachilife:

1952- Badass. Whenever I see this picture I always think of Christina Ricci in Mermaids.

ilovemymariachilife:

1952- Badass. Whenever I see this picture I always think of Christina Ricci in Mermaids.

(via noterajeschicanita)

sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)
sosuperawesome:

Book sculptures by Jodi Harvey-Brown
Shop (Commissions welcome)

medievalpoc:

khakhov:

stalinwasabasicbitch:

medievalpoc:

Abraham Janssens

The Agrippine Sibyl

Netherlands (c. 1575)

Düsseldorf, Kunst Palast

Does anyone know the history/story behind this painting? Is it religious, classical, a portrait? 

All I know is that Sibyls are female holy people…I believe there’s a “set” of Sibyls that are wise women that I thiiiiink represent certain religious/spiritual/moral aspects. Honestly, I know little about what this painting is but from my art history studies, this is what I can say:

1. This MAY be a portrait. Sometimes, people were painted as religious figures - this was not unusual for this period and location.

2. SYMBOLISM is highly important in this region and time (as it is in many others) - crown of thorns is visible, dressed in fineries, the scroll, the rod (which might also be a pen?) - all of these can be linked to the Christian religion.

3. After a Google Search, the text on the scroll “siccabitur ut(?) folium” means “wither as leaf” - I am sorry, I don’t know what this is referring to.

Unfortunately, I have always had a little trouble picking out Christian symbolism. This is what I can poop out for now!

From How to Distinguish Saints in Art by Their Costumes, Symbols and Attributes:

The Sibyls were legendary prophetesses who were said to have foretold to the Gentiles,as the prophets has foretold them to the Jews, various aspects of the Advent and Sojourn upon earth of the Messiah. They were twelve in number: the Persian Sibyl, the Libyan, the Delvic, the Erithrean, the Cumean, the Samean, the Cimmerian, the Tiburtine, the Hellespontine, the Phrygian, the European, and the Agrippine.

The majority of the Sibyls were said to have pagan roots, and as is obvious from the list, only one is mentioned to have hailed from Europe, so we can assume these were almost all women of color.

As for the woman in this painting, it is very likely she was a woman hired by Janssens to sit for the portrait, on account of her beauty and regal bearing. During this era of Netherlandish painting, commissioned paintings of Black people in lavish dress and jewelry were common, since much of the arts were funded by wealthy patrons who were very invested in international trade. The Adoration was also a very popular contemporaneous choice of subject, as depictions of incredibly wealthy traders with dark skin were often showcased to foster goodwill with traders from afar.

(via medievalpoc)